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Black pawn structure: e6, f7, f6, h7
06-01-2010, 12:13 PM (This post was last modified: 06-01-2010 12:17 PM by Rookpawn.)
Post: #1
Black pawn structure: e6, f7, f6, h7
Here is a pawn structure that I see regularly in the Zuke. It occurs often after the black
Bishop exchange with the Nf6. Blacks pawns are on a6, e6, f6, and h7. And white has a
queenside pawn, a3 in this case, and e3,f2,g2,h2. The most significant feature being blacks
Kingside pawns.


Lets take a look from one of my own games.

[White "RookPawn"]
[Black "bobby fissure"]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e3 e6 4.Bd3 c5 5.b3 Nc6 6.O-O Bd6 7.Bb2 O-O 8.dxc5 Bxc5 9.a3 a6 10.Nbd2
b5 11.Qe2 Bb7 12.Rfd1 Rc8

A key item that I am looking at here is the Nf6. Its only being protected by the Qd8 and g7 pawn.

13.c4 dxc4 14.bxc4 bxc4 15.Bxc4 Qb6

White abandons the Nf6! Its only defender is now, the g7 pawn.

16.Rab1 (Bxf6 can be played here also.) Qa7

The pawn structure around the king can be compromised!

17.Bxf6 gxf6

We have the above mentioned pawn structure around blacks king.

Several questions come to mind about this structure in general:
A. If whites plays for this structure can white claim a minor victory?
B. Is whites play, longterm, better? Based on the pawn structure alone. Short term Tactical based on the weakened structure around the King?
c. What is whites best way to play against this type stucture?
D. Blacks best defence. Piece placement etc. Are his pieces active enough for compensation?

If this is an example of the type of structure that can come up time and again in the Zuke, what can we learn from it now so we can make better decisions in the future?

As and example, lets put on our fantasy hats here and just look at the pawns. Take all the pieces off the board. Who has the advantage in a king and pawn endgame? Is it enough to win or can black hold?

[FEN "6k1/5p1p/p3pp2/8/8/P3P3/5PPP/6K1 w - - 0 18"]

Calling all K&P game gurus. I think White should have the push in this endgame. So

we generate a few more questions:
1. Can White exchange down and have an advantagous ending?
2. Does Black need to avoid a K&P endgame with the current structure and find an

tactical solution, or improve his endgame posibilities prior to exchanging down.

The game ended:
18.Ne4 Be7 19.Rd7 Rb8 20.Rxe7 Nxe7 21.Nxf6+ Kg7 22.Qb2 Rg8 23.Nd7+ Kh6 24.Qf6+ Ng6 25.Nfe5
Rbf8 26.Ng4+ Kh5 27.h4 {Black resigned} 1-0

In conclusion: What I'm beating around the bush about is that us Zuke people can look and
see opportunities and know how to exploit them will in advance. What if we knew what to do with this structure before we had the opportunity to play Bxf6?
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06-02-2010, 04:25 AM (This post was last modified: 06-02-2010 04:25 AM by Rudel.)
Post: #2
RE: Black pawn structue6, f7, f6, h7
(06-01-2010 12:13 PM)Rookpawn Wrote:  Here is a pawn structure that I see regularly in the Zuke. It occurs often after the black
Bishop exchange with the Nf6. Blacks pawns are on a6, e6, f6, and h7. And white has a
queenside pawn, a3 in this case, and e3,f2,g2,h2. The most significant feature being blacks
Kingside pawns.


Lets take a look from one of my own games.

[White "RookPawn"]
[Black "bobby fissure"]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e3 e6 4.Bd3 c5 5.b3 Nc6 6.O-O Bd6 7.Bb2 O-O 8.dxc5 Bxc5 9.a3 a6 10.Nbd2
b5 11.Qe2 Bb7 12.Rfd1 Rc8

A key item that I am looking at here is the Nf6. Its only being protected by the Qd8 and g7 pawn.

13.c4 dxc4 14.bxc4 bxc4 15.Bxc4 Qb6

White abandons the Nf6! Its only defender is now, the g7 pawn.

16.Rab1 (Bxf6 can be played here also.) Qa7

The pawn structure around the king can be compromised!

17.Bxf6 gxf6

We have the above mentioned pawn structure around blacks king.

Several questions come to mind about this structure in general:
A. If whites plays for this structure can white claim a minor victory?
B. Is whites play, longterm, better? Based on the pawn structure alone. Short term Tactical based on the weakened structure around the King?
c. What is whites best way to play against this type stucture?
D. Blacks best defence. Piece placement etc. Are his pieces active enough for compensation?

If this is an example of the type of structure that can come up time and again in the Zuke, what can we learn from it now so we can make better decisions in the future?

As and example, lets put on our fantasy hats here and just look at the pawns. Take all the pieces off the board. Who has the advantage in a king and pawn endgame? Is it enough to win or can black hold?

[FEN "6k1/5p1p/p3pp2/8/8/P3P3/5PPP/6K1 w - - 0 18"]

Calling all K&P game gurus. I think White should have the push in this endgame. So

we generate a few more questions:
1. Can White exchange down and have an advantagous ending?
2. Does Black need to avoid a K&P endgame with the current structure and find an

tactical solution, or improve his endgame posibilities prior to exchanging down.

The game ended:
18.Ne4 Be7 19.Rd7 Rb8 20.Rxe7 Nxe7 21.Nxf6+ Kg7 22.Qb2 Rg8 23.Nd7+ Kh6 24.Qf6+ Ng6 25.Nfe5
Rbf8 26.Ng4+ Kh5 27.h4 {Black resigned} 1-0

In conclusion: What I'm beating around the bush about is that us Zuke people can look and
see opportunities and know how to exploit them will in advance. What if we knew what to do with this structure before we had the opportunity to play Bxf6?

I think this is a great idea. For right now, I think I only have time to help by posting the game here.
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07-29-2010, 01:55 AM
Post: #3
RE: Black pawn structue6, f7, f6, h7
My first thought was: this looks like the classic ending Cohn-Rubinstein, can White use the same king manoeuvre? I couldn't remember the details, and had to look it up: this is ending 1-84 in Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual, but is treated in many other places e.g. Tactical Chess Endings by Nunn. Here it is:

[Event "St. Petersburg"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Cohn, Erich"]
[Black "Rubinstein, Akiba"]
[Result "0-1"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "8/pp2kppp/4p3/8/1Pr5/P3PP2/3K1P1P/R7 w - - 0 24"]
[PlyCount "30"]
[EventDate "1909.??.??"]

24. Rc1 Rxc1 25. Kxc1 Kf6 26. Kd2 Kg5 27. Ke2 Kh4 28. Kf1 Kh3 29. Kg1 e5 30. Kh1 b5 31. Kg1 f5 32. Kh1 g5 33. Kg1 h5 34. Kh1 g4 35. e4 fxe4 36. fxe4 h4 37. Kg1 g3 38. hxg3 hxg3 0-1

After conning White into exchanging rooks, Black pins down White's king, advances his kingside pawns and exchanges most of them off so as to expose the e-pawn. He is then able to exploit his superior king position to win the e-pawn and the game. Sounds easy, and Rubinstein makes it look easy, but Nunn covers a page or two in variations to show that there's a bit more to it.

Here's another example from Pawn Endings by Mueller and Lamprecht:

[Event "USSR Army Ch (Tashkent)"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1987.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Liogky, N.."]
[Black "Nenashev, A.."]
[Result "1-0"]
[Annotator "Mueller & Lamprecht"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "2k5/5p1p/p3pp2/8/4P3/P4P2/5KPP/8 w - - 0 0"]
[PlyCount "27"]

1. Kg3 $1 (1. Ke3 $2 e5 2. Kd3 Kc7 3. Kc4 Kc6 4. g4 Kd6 5. Kb4 Kc6 6. Ka5 Kb7 $1 $11) 1... Kd7 2. Kh4 Ke7 3. Kh5 $1 Kf8 4. Kh6 $1 Kg8 5. f4 Kh8 6. g4 Kg8 7. h4 a5 8. a4 Kh8 9. e5 fxe5 10. fxe5 $1 Kg8 11. g5 (11. h5 Kh8 12. Kg5 Kg7 13. h6+ $1 Kf8 14. Kf6 $1 Ke8 (14... Kg8 15. Ke7 Kh8 16. Kf8 $18) 15. Kg7 (15. g5 $6 Kf8 16. g6 fxg6 17. Kxe6 $1 Ke8 18. Kf6 $1 Kf8 19. e6 $1 Ke8 20. Kg7 $1 $18) 15... Ke7 16. Kxh7 Kf8 17. g5 $18) 11... Kh8 12. h5 $1 (12. Kh5 $2 Kg7 $1 13. Kg4 Kf8 $11) 12... Kg8 13. g6 Kh8 (13... hxg6 14. hxg6 $1 Kh8 $5 15. Kg5 Kg7 16. gxf7 $1 Kxf7 17. Kh6 $1 $18) 14. gxh7 ({Not} 14. gxf7 {stalemate}) 1-0

So how does this affect our ending? Well, not directly because in the given position White can't get his king to h6. Nevertheless Black has to be careful and keep the possibility in mind. At the very least it's useful to have this in your toolbox.
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07-29-2010, 04:46 AM
Post: #4
RE: Black pawn structure: e6, f7, f6, h7
Excellent! Thanks, Graham!
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