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C-Z Phoenix attack
05-20-2010, 08:29 AM
Post: #1
C-Z Phoenix attack
[Event "RA-2009-0-00077"]
[Site "Lechenicher SchachServer"]
[Date "2010.05.18"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Schroeder, Christoph"]
[Black "Sorcinelli, Andrea"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D05"]
[WhiteElo "2102"]
[BlackElo "2091"]
[Annotator "Schroeder"]
[PlyCount "135"]
[EventDate "2009.12.21"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. e3 e6 4. Bd3 c5 5. b3 Nc6 6. O-O Bd6 7. Bb2 O-O 8. dxc5
Bxc5 9. a3 h6 ({Prophylaxis against a possible Nf3-g5 attack, but this seems a
bit too anxious and is not yet necessary. A more natural move is} 9... Qe7 {
, which was played by two of my opponents (IM Dorel Oltean and Stefan Salzmann)
in the final round of the LSS anniversary cup tournament. These games are
still in progress, and I'll post them when finished.}) 10. b4 Be7 11. Nbd2 a6
12. c4 dxc4 13. Nxc4 b5 14. Nce5 Bb7 15. Nxc6 Bxc6 16. Ne5 Rc8 17. Nxc6 ({
Grabbing the bishop pair gives White a slight but lasting advantage. Other
moves promise White nothing:} 17. Qe2 Bb7 18. Rfd1 Bd6 $11) (17. Rc1 Bb7 18.
Rxc8 Qxc8 19. Qe2 Qb8 20. Ng4 Nxg4 21. Qxg4 Bg5 $1 $11 {(followed by f7-f5)})
17... Rxc6 18. Qf3 Rd6 (18... Qd5 19. e4 $14) 19. Be2 Rd2 ({With} 19... Qa8 {
Black could force a queen's exchange. But basically this does not ease his
task, because in positions with reduced material the bishop pair can become
especially strong.}) 20. Rfd1 Qd7 21. Rac1 Rd8 22. g3 Qd5 23. Bd4 Rxd1+ 24.
Rxd1 Qa2 25. e4 ({
Protecting a3 and grabbing space in the centre. A tricky move is} 25. Kg2 $5 {
, but Black has a good answer in} Ne4 $1 ({
in a correspondence game Black will certainly not fall in} 25... Qxa3 $2 26.
Bxf6 Rxd1 (26... Bxf6 $4 27. Rxd8+ Bxd8 28. Qa8 $18) 27. Bxe7 $16) 26. Qxe4
Qxe2 27. Rc1 Bf6 28. Rc2 Qd1 29. Bxf6 gxf6 $14 {
when White's advantage in the Rook/Queen ending is minimal.}) 25... Qc2 26. Bc5
$1 Re8 $8 27. e5 Nd5 28. Bd3 Qc3 ({
The Queen uses the c-file as an escape route. Staying in enemy's territory with
} 28... Qa2 $6 {
makes it easier for White to organize an attack on the Kingside, e.g.} 29. Bd4
g6 30. h4 h5 31. g4 $40) 29. Bd4 Qc6 30. Kg2 (30. Be4 Rd8 31. Bb2 {
also retains White's slight advantage.}) 30... g6 31. h4 h5 32. Be4 Rd8 33. g4
({Opening up lines on the Kingside must be the right plan to progress.
Inaccurate is} 33. Bb2 $6 Bf8 {and now it is too late for} 34. g4 $6 hxg4 35.
Qxg4 Qc4 36. Rc1 Qb3 $132) 33... hxg4 34. Qxg4 Kf8 35. Bb2 (35. h5 $5 {allows}
gxh5 36. Qxh5 Nf4+ 37. Kh2 Nxh5 38. Bxc6 $14 {This ending offers White still
some winning chances. But here I wanted to keep the queens on board in view of
my kingside attacking possibilities.}) 35... Qc7 ({Risky is} 35... Qc4 $6 36.
Rc1 Qb3 (36... Qa2 37. Rc2 Qb1 38. Qf3 $16) 37. Rc2 a5 {
(an insufficient try for counterplay)} 38. bxa5 b4 39. axb4 Nxb4 40. Re2 Nd5
41. Bc1 Qc4 42. Bd2 Ke8 43. Bf3 $16 {
and Black has problems regaining the a-pawn}) 36. Rc1 Qd7 (36... Qa7 37. Rh1
Qc7 (37... Nxb4 $2 38. Rh3 $1 Rd2 39. Rf3 $1 $18 {with a winning attack}) (
37... Ne3+ $2 38. fxe3 Rd2+ 39. Kf3 Rxb2 40. Qf4 $40) 38. Qf3 Kg8 (38... Ke8
39. h5 gxh5 40. Rxh5 $40) 39. h5 $40) 37. Kg3 $1 (37. Rh1 $2 Ne3+ 38. fxe3 Qd2+
39. Kh3 Qxb2 40. Rf1 Qxe5 41. Qxg6 f5 $11) 37... Ke8 $1 (37... f5 $6 38. exf6
Bxf6 39. Bxf6 Nxf6 40. Qxg6 Nxe4+ 41. Qxe4 Qd3+ 42. f3 Qxe4 43. fxe4 Rd3+ 44.
Kf4 Rxa3 45. h5 $16) 38. h5 gxh5 39. Qxh5 Bf8 40. Qg4 Ne7 41. Kg2 (41. Rh1 $2
Qd2 42. Ba1 Bh6 43. Qh4 Bg5 44. Qg4 Bh6 $11) 41... Qd2 (41... a5 $6 {
looks active, but White has several ways to a clear advantage:} 42. Bc3 (42.
Rc3 axb4 43. Rf3 Nf5 44. axb4 $16) (42. Rh1 axb4 43. Rh7 Nf5 44. Qg8 Rc8 45.
axb4 $16) 42... a4 43. Rh1 $16) 42. Rc2 Qe1 43. Bc3 Qb1 44. Bd2 (44. Qe2 $6 Qb3
45. Bb2 Bh6 46. Qf3 Qxf3+ 47. Kxf3 Rd2 48. Rxd2 Bxd2 49. Bb7 {
does not win material because of} Kd7 50. Bxa6 Kc6 51. Ke2 Bf4 52. a4 bxa4 $11)
44... Qa1 45. Bf4 ({In correspondence chess one can never expect the opponent
to make severe errors. This game is a good example for the long maneuvring
that is necessary in an advantageous position for every tiny step forward. On
the other hand, a slight inaccuracy could easily make the advantage evaporate
completely, e.g.} 45. Qg3 $6 Qd4 46. f3 Rc8 47. Rxc8+ Nxc8 48. Bc6+ Kd8 49.
Qg5+ Be7 50. Qe3 Qxe3 51. Bxe3 Kc7 $11) 45... Qd4 $1 ({
Black continues avoiding all pitfalls:} 45... Qxa3 $2 46. Bg5 Qxb4 47. Qf3 {
(with the deadly threat of Bc6+)} Rd5 48. Bxd5 $18) 46. Qf3 Nd5 47. Rc1 $6 ({
If there is one moment in the game where I let my opponent off the hook, it is
probably here:} 47. Rd2 $1 Qc4 48. Bg5 Be7 49. Bh6 {
and White's pressure is more than the black position can bear, e.g.:} a5 (49...
Kd7 50. Qg4 $1 Rg8 (50... Ke8 51. Kh2 $1 Bf8 52. Qg8 Ke7 53. Bg5+ Ke8 54. Bf3
$18) 51. Qxg8 Qxe4+ 52. f3 Qxe5 53. Qxf7 Kc6 54. Qg7 Qh5 55. Rc2+ Kb6 56. Qg3
$1 $18) (49... Bh4 50. Rc2 Qd4 51. Qg4 Kd7 52. Rd2 Rg8 53. Rxd4 Rxg4+ 54. Kf3
$18) (49... Rd7 50. Rc2 Qd4 51. Qg4 Rd8 52. Rc7 $1 Qxe4+ 53. Qxe4 Nxc7 54. Qc6+
Rd7 55. Qb7 Bd8 56. Qc8 $18) 50. bxa5 Qa4 51. a6 Ra8 52. Qg4 Bf8 53. Bg5 Bxa3
54. a7 (54. Qf3 Rxa6 55. Rxd5 exd5 56. Bxd5 $18) 54... Bc5 55. Bh6 Ke7 56. Qg5+
Kd7 57. Rxd5+ exd5 58. Qf5+ Kc7 59. Qxf7+ Kb6 60. Qe6+ Kxa7 61. Qxd5 $18) ({
Instead,} 47. Rc6 $2 Bg7 $1 48. Bg5 Bxe5 49. Rxa6 (49. Bxd8 $2 Nf4+) 49... Bf6
50. Bxd5 Bxg5 51. Bxe6 fxe6 52. Qh5+ Kf8 53. Qxg5 Qe4+ 54. Kh2 Qh7+ 55. Kg3
Rd3+ 56. f3 Rxf3+ 57. Kxf3 Qb7+ 58. Kf4 Qxa6 $11 {
would only lead to a drawn ending.}) 47... Qb6 $1 (47... Bg7 $2 {
gives White's rook the opportunity to enter the seventh rank:} 48. Bg5 Rb8 49.
Bxd5 Qxd5 (49... exd5 $2 50. Qh3 $1 $18) 50. Qxd5 exd5 51. Rc7 {
when Black's problems can hardly be solved.}) 48. Rh1 (48. Bd2 Qd4 49. Bc3 Qa7
50. Rh1 Qc7 51. Bb2 $16 {keeps the advantage, but White can make no progress
as long as the dark-squared bishop stays on the a1-h8 diagonal.}) 48... Qd4 49.
Rh8 Kd7 50. Bg3 Be7 51. Rh1 Kc6 (51... Kc7 $6 52. Rh7 Rf8 53. Bg6 {
enables White to win the f7 pawn without giving up the bishop pair.}) 52. Re1 (
{I am not sure if} 52. Rd1 {was better:} Qc4 53. Bd3 Qa2 54. Kh2 Kd7 (54... Rf8
55. Be4 Qc4 56. Kg1 Kb6 57. Bxd5 exd5 58. Rxd5 Rd8 59. Rxd8 Bxd8 $16 {
is a position that was reached in the game}) 55. Qxf7 Rf8 56. Qh5 Rxf2+ 57.
Bxf2 Qxf2+ 58. Kh1 $16 {White is better, but Black still has considerable
drawing chances due to the naked white king.}) ({Also possible was} 52. Rc1+
Kb6 53. Re1 Rf8 54. Rd1 Qc4 55. Bxd5 exd5 56. Rxd5 {, which leads to the game.}
) 52... Rf8 53. Rc1+ (53. Rd1 Qc4 54. Rd3 Kb6 55. Bxd5 exd5 56. Rxd5 {
is a transposition to the game.}) 53... Kb6 54. Rd1 Qc4 55. Bxd5 exd5 56. Rxd5
Rd8 57. Rxd8 Bxd8 58. Bf4 Qe6 59. Kg3 Kc7 60. Qe4 Kd7 61. Bd2 f6 62. Bc3 Bc7
63. f4 fxe5 64. Bxe5 Bxe5 65. fxe5 {Black has survived the worst, and the
Queen ending gives him a lot of drawing chances.} Ke7 66. Qh7+ (66. Qb7+ Ke8
67. Qb8+ Kd7 68. Qa7+ Ke8 69. Qe3 Qg6+ 70. Kf4) 66... Kd8 67. Kf4 Qc6 68. Qh8+
$138 {My Italian opponent has defended resiliently and managed to stay on the
board despite heavy pressure.The Queen's ending could have gone on for a long
time, and the probable outcome would be a draw. But at this point, Sorcinelli
withdrew from the tournament.} 1-0
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05-20-2010, 10:57 AM
Post: #2
RE: C-Z Phoenix attack
Thanks! I should definitely update our database soon...I just haven't made the time with my other book projects. I really appreciate your games, though!
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05-20-2010, 11:13 AM
Post: #3
RE: C-Z Phoenix attack
I've only made it through the first 25 moves or so, but this is really good play.

Do you think this 9...h6 deserves a line in my book? It isn't awful, but I think it's pretty clear once that move comes down that Black is not going to get equality any time soon. Still, some guidance for White is probably appropriate.
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05-20-2010, 09:36 PM
Post: #4
RE: C-Z Phoenix attack
Yes, I think that 9.-h6?! is inferior to all three alternatives (9.-Qe7, 9.-b6 and 9.-a6) that you have analysed, and it does not contain any distinctive ideas for Black. So a short footnote should be enough.

BTW: I found another corr game where 9.-h6 was played. There Black reached equality after 11 c4?!, so I think it is definitely better to prepare c4 by 11 Nbd2.

[Event "CB.2006.0.00166"]
[Site "IECG"]
[Date "2006.12.24"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Bourgoin, Claude"]
[Black "Gor, Ozkan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D05"]
[WhiteElo "1936"]
[BlackElo "1800"]
[PlyCount "63"]
[EventDate "2006.12.24"]
[EventType "tourn (corr)"]

1. d4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 e6 4. Bd3 c5 5. b3 Nc6 6. O-O Bd6 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Bb2
O-O 9. a3 h6 10. b4 Be7 11. c4 dxc4 12. Bxc4 Qc7 13. b5 Rd8 14. Nbd2 Na5 15.
Be2 b6 16. Qa4 Bd7 17. Ne4 Nxe4 18. Qxe4 Rac8 19. Qg4 f6 20. Nd4 Bf8 21. Rfd1
Qe5 22. Rd2 f5 23. Qh4 Qe4 24. Qxe4 fxe4 25. Rad1 Re8 26. Nc6 Bxc6 27. bxc6
Nxc6 28. Rd7 Re7 29. Bg4 Kf7 30. f3 Na5 31. fxe4 Rc7 32. Rd8 1-0
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05-25-2010, 10:46 AM
Post: #5
RE: C-Z Phoenix attack
In today's 3rd round of Hamburg championship, I had a Phoenix attack from a Benoni move order:

[Event "HEM"]
[Site "Hamburg"]
[Date "2010.05.24"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Schroeder, Christoph"]
[Black "Rosmann, Ilja"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "A46"]
[WhiteElo "2237"]
[BlackElo "2329"]
[PlyCount "109"]
[EventDate "2010.??.??"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "GER"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. e3 c5 4. Bd3 Nc6 5. O-O Be7 {
This is covered in "Zuke Em", chapter 8.4 (The Queen's Indian and Benoni)} 6.
dxc5 Bxc5 7. a3 d5 ({Now we have transposed to the Phoenix attack. Viktor
Kortschnoj once drew with the immediate retreat of his bishop followed by
d7-d6 and a kind of hedgehog setup:} 7... Be7 8. c4 (8. e4 $14 {
looks better to me}) 8... d6 9. Nc3 O-O 10. b3 b6 11. Bb2 Bb7 12. Bc2 Ne5 13.
Nd4 Nc6 14. Nxc6 Bxc6 15. Qd3 Re8 16. e4 a6 $11 {
Franco Ocampos,Z (2510)-Kortschnoj,V (2585)/Mesa 1992/}) 8. b4 Bd6 ({
The only predecessor game in my database (and analysed in Zuke Em) went} 8...
Bb6 9. Bb2 O-O 10. Nbd2 Re8 11. b5 Nb8 12. Ne5 $6 (12. c4) 12... Nbd7 13. Ndf3
Ne4 14. Nxd7 Qxd7 15. Ne5 Qe7 16. c4 f6 17. cxd5 exd5 18. Bc2 Rd8 19. Nd3 d4 $2
20. Nf4 $1 Bf5 21. exd4 Bc7 22. Qh5 g6 23. Qh6 Ng5 $2 (23... Qf7) 24. Bb3+ $18
{Gereben,E-Szabo,L/Budapest 1937}) 9. Bb2 ({I didn't like} 9. c4 {
because it allows} Ne5) 9... a5 $6 {Provokes b4-b5, in order to use the then
vacant square c5 by the knight-maneuvre Nc6-b8-d7-c5. But this is rather
time-consuming, and Black gets further behind in development.} 10. b5 Nb8 {
Here a difficult decision had to be made, which cost me 20 minutes: play for
c4 (positionally good) or e4 (tactically promising in view of my better
development). I decided for the latter.} 11. Nbd2 Nbd7 12. e4 dxe4 13. Nxe4 Be7
({Planning to oppose the bishop on f6. I had expected} 13... Nxe4 14. Bxe4 Nc5
15. Re1 $14) 14. Qe2 Nxe4 15. Bxe4 (15. Qxe4 $5 {also comes into consideration:
} Nc5 16. Qe5 Bf6 17. Qxc5 Bxb2 18. Rab1 Bf6 19. b6 $1 $14) 15... Bf6 16. c4
O-O 17. Rfd1 (17. Bxf6 $1 Qxf6 (17... Nxf6 18. c5 {
and the white c-pawn becomes mobile}) 18. Qd3 g6 19. Qd6 {
invading the black position on the dark squares, was better.}) 17... Bxb2 18.
Qxb2 f5 $6 19. Bc2 $6 (19. Bxb7 $1 Bxb7 20. Ne5 Bc8 21. Qd4 Rf7 22. c5 Qc7 23.
Nxf7 Kxf7 24. b6 Qc6 25. Qd6 $16 {
when the passed pawns give White a clear advantage}) 19... Qf6 20. Qxf6 gxf6 $1
({The best of the three possible recaptures, in view of} 20... Rxf6 $6 21. Rd6
$16) (20... Nxf6 $2 21. Ne5 $16) 21. Rd6 Kf7 22. Rad1 Ke7 23. R6d4 Rf7 $2 24.
Ne1 $2 (24. Re1 $1 {wins a pawn:} Nc5 25. Bxf5 e5 26. Nh4 $16) 24... b6 25. Nd3
e5 $6 26. Rd5 $1 (26. Rh4 $2 Rg7 $11) 26... Ra7 ({Of course not} 26... Bb7 $2
27. Rxd7+ Kxd7 28. Nxe5+ Ke6 29. Nxf7 Kxf7 30. Rd7+ $18) 27. c5 e4 $5 (27...
Nxc5 28. Nxc5 Rc7 29. Bb3 bxc5 30. b6 Rb7 31. Rxc5 Rf8 32. f4 $1 $16) 28. c6 $6
(28. Re1 $1 Kf8 29. Nb2 Rc7 {and only now} 30. c6 $16) 28... exd3 29. cxd7 Rxd7
30. R1xd3 $6 (30. R5xd3 {
still keeps some advantage (Black has no Be6 with tempo), e.g.} Ke8 31. Bb3
Rfe7 32. Kf1 $14) 30... Rxd5 31. Rxd5 Be6 32. Rd4 Rg7 $6 (32... Rf8 {
followed by Rc8 is completely equal}) 33. f3 ({On} 33. Rf4 $2 {
Black has the strong reply} Kd6 $1 34. Bxf5 $4 Ke5 $19) 33... Rg8 34. Rf4 (34.
Rh4 Rc8 35. Rxh7+ Kd6 {and Black's pieces become very active.}) 34... Rc8 $1 (
34... Rg5 $2 35. h4 Rh5 $16 {takes the rook out of play}) 35. Bxf5 Bxf5 36.
Rxf5 Rc3 {Black wins the a-pawn, which is sufficient for the draw.} 37. Rh5
Rxa3 38. Rxh7+ Kd6 39. h4 Rb3 $1 (39... Kc5 $2 {
is the wrong way to pick up the b-pawn:} 40. h5 Kxb5 41. h6 Rd3 42. Ra7 Rd8 43.
h7 Kc5 44. g4 $16) 40. h5 Rxb5 41. g4 (41. h6 a4 42. Ra7 Rh5 43. h7 a3 44. g4
Rh6 $11) 41... a4 42. Ra7 Ra5 43. Rxa5 bxa5 44. h6 a3 45. h7 a2 46. h8=Q a1=Q+
47. Kg2 Qb2+ 48. Kg3 (48. Kh3 $11) 48... Qe5+ 49. Kh3 Kc5 50. Qc8+ (50. Qd8 Kc4
51. Qd1 $11) 50... Kd4 (50... Kb4 51. Qb7+ Ka3 52. Qc6 $11) 51. Qc2 Ke3 52. Kg2
Qd4 53. Qc1+ Qd2+ 54. Qxd2+ Kxd2 55. f4 1/2-1/2
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09-21-2010, 10:57 AM
Post: #6
RE: C-Z Phoenix attack
[Event "BI-2009-F-00002"]
[Site "Lechenicher SchachServer"]
[Date "2010.09.04"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Schroeder, Christoph"]
[Black "Salzmann, Stefan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D05"]
[WhiteElo "2111"]
[BlackElo "2113"]
[Annotator "Schroeder"]
[PlyCount "127"]
[EventDate "2010.02.17"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. e3 c5 4. Bd3 d5 5. b3 Nc6 6. O-O Bd6 7. Bb2 O-O 8. dxc5
Bxc5 9. a3 Qe7 10. b4 Bd6 $6 ({Since Black's plan of advancing his e-pawn
proves insufficient with the bishop on d6, it seems better to play} 10... Bb6)
11. Nbd2 e5 12. c4 e4 $6 (12... Rd8 13. cxd5 Nxd5 14. Ne4 {
leads to a slight White advantage, as shown in ZukeEm.}) 13. Bxf6 Qxf6 (13...
gxf6 14. cxd5 $14 {
gives White a lasting advantage due to the damaged black pawn structure.}) 14.
Bxe4 {Now it becomes clear that Bd6 is a tactical liability.} dxe4 15. Nxe4
Bxh2+ 16. Nxh2 {White has won a pawn, and one might ask how it is possible
that an experienced corr player deliberately plays a line like this as Black.
The reason is that Rybka and Fritz do not completely dismiss this line because
they see compensation for Black (slightly better development) - at least as
yet. The more the game proceeds, the more the alleged compensation diminishes.
I believe that Black's compensation is definitely insufficient and that White
is clearly better.} Qg6 17. Ng3 Rd8 (17... Be6 18. c5 Bc4 19. Re1 Rfd8 20. Qc1
$16 {Bourgoin,C (1883)-Hansen,H/ICCF 2006}) 18. Qh5 $146 ({
With this move we leave known territory. Also good is} 18. Qf3 Ne5 19. Qf4 Nd3
20. Qh4 Be6 21. Nf3 b6 22. Rad1 $16 {
Bourgoin,C (1911)-Bergmann,M (2442)/LSS 2006}) 18... Be6 19. Rfc1 Qxh5 (19...
Qd3 20. Qb5 Rd7 (20... Rab8 21. Nh5 $16) 21. Nh5 $16) 20. Nxh5 a5 21. b5 Ne5
22. c5 a4 23. Ng3 Rac8 24. c6 bxc6 25. f4 Nc4 $6 ({
With this move Black surrenders a piece. Maybe} 25... Nd3 {
gives somewhat better surviving chances, e.g.:} 26. Rxc6 Rb8 (26... Nb2 27.
Rxc8 Rxc8 28. Nf3 $16) 27. Rd1 Rd5 (27... Rxb5 $2 28. f5 $1 {
wins thanks to backrank mate motifs}) 28. e4 Rd7 29. f5 Bb3 30. Rd2 $16) 26. f5
cxb5 (26... Bd5 27. e4) 27. fxe6 fxe6 {Black has only 2 pawns for the piece,
and it is only a question of time when the white knights will pick up one of
the black queenside pawns. The rest of the game does not need much commentary.}
28. Nhf1 Rd3 29. Ne4 Rcd8 30. Nc3 Nd6 31. Ne2 Nc4 32. Nd4 Rxa3 (32... Nxe3 33.
Nc6 $16) (32... Nxa3 $2 33. Nxe6 R8d6 34. Nc5 $18) 33. Nxb5 Rxa1 34. Rxa1 Nb6 (
34... Ra8 35. Nc7 $16) 35. Kf2 Kf7 36. Ke2 Ke7 37. Nd2 Ra8 38. Na3 Rc8 39. Ne4
Rc7 40. Rh1 h6 41. Rb1 Nd5 42. Kd3 Ra7 43. Nc5 Nf6 44. Kd4 Nd7 45. Nb5 Ra5 46.
Nxd7 Kxd7 47. Kc5 Ke7 48. Kb4 Ra8 49. Nc3 h5 50. Ra1 Kf6 51. Rxa4 Rd8 (51...
Rxa4+ 52. Nxa4 h4 53. Nc3 Kf5 54. Kc4 g5 55. Kd4 e5+ 56. Kd5 g4 57. Ne4 h3 58.
g3 h2 59. Nf2 e4 60. Kd6 $18) 52. Kc4 h4 (52... e5 53. Ra2 Kf5 54. Rf2+ Kg4 55.
Ne4 Rd7 56. Rf8 h4 57. Rf3 Rd8 58. Rf7 g6 59. Rf6 Kh5 60. Re6 $18) 53. Ra5 e5
54. Ra2 Ke6 (54... Kg6 55. Rf2 Ra8 56. Kd3 Ra3 57. Ra2 Rb3 58. Ra4 Kg5 59. Re4
$18) 55. Rf2 Rc8+ 56. Kd3 Rd8+ 57. Ke2 Rh8 58. Ne4 Rh5 59. Rf8 Kd5 60. Kf3 h3
61. gxh3 Rxh3+ 62. Ng3 Rh6 63. e4+ Ke6 64. Nf5 {
White will now win another pawn within a few moves. Black resigned.} 1-0
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09-30-2010, 06:48 PM
Post: #7
RE: C-Z Phoenix attack
I consider the following game my best game with the Phoenix attack so far, and it is also theoretically important. My attacking maneuvre 20.h3, 21.Nh2, 22.Ng4 is non-standard, I have never seen this before in comparable positions.

[Event "BI-2009-F-00002"]
[Site "Lechenicher SchachServer"]
[Date "2010.07.31"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Schroeder, Christoph"]
[Black "Oltean, Dorel"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D05"]
[WhiteElo "2111"]
[BlackElo "2385"]
[PlyCount "74"]
[EventDate "2010.02.17"]

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. e3 e6 4. Bd3 c5 5. b3 Nc6 6. O-O Bd6 7. Bb2 O-O 8. dxc5
Bxc5 9. a3 Qe7 10. b4 Bd6 $6 11. Nbd2 e5 12. c4 Rd8 (12... dxc4 13. Nxc4 Rd8
14. Qc2 a6 15. Ng5 h6 16. Ne4 Nxe4 17. Bxe4 $14 {
White's pieces were more active in Brousek,J (2191)-Tortato,L (1442)/IECG 2004}
) (12... e4 $6 {see game Schroeder - Salzmann (previous posting)}) 13. cxd5
Nxd5 14. Qc2 ({The stem game of the Phoenix attack (at least I don't know of
any older games) was played in Karlsbad 1911 between Dus Chotimirsky and
Kostic. It went} 14. Bb1 $6 Bg4 $2 (14... a6) 15. b5 Na5 16. Qa4 Bxf3 17. Nxf3
$16 {and White was clearly better, although the game was eventuelly drawn.})
14... g6 15. Rfd1 Be6 16. Ne4 f6 17. Bc4 Nb6 18. Bb3 Rac8 19. Bc3 Rd7 20. h3 $1
({Black's kingside is softened up, and the weak spot is f6. White's play
focuses on this spot by transferring the knight from f3 to g4. Instead, White
can also keep a slight plus with} 20. Qa2 Nd8 21. Rd3 $14) 20... Nd8 21. Nh2
Kg7 22. Ng4 Bf5 23. Ngxf6 $1 Qxf6 24. Qb2 Nc4 (24... Bxe4 25. Rxd6 Rxd6 26.
Bxe5 $16) 25. Bxc4 Bxe4 26. Rxd6 Rxd6 27. Bxe5 Rxc4 28. f3 Bc6 29. b5 Be8 30.
a4 $16 Rc7 31. Bxf6+ Rxf6 {With rook plus two minor pieces against queen and
two pawns, Black is not that bad off materially, but he still suffers from the
pin on the long diagonal, and his pieces are badly coordinated. White has a
clear, maybe winning advantage.} 32. Rc1 Rd7 33. Qe5 Ne6 34. Rc8 Bf7 (34... Re7
35. Qb8 Bd7 36. Qxb7 Rff7 37. Ra8 Be8 38. Qd5 $18) 35. a5 Nd8 36. Ra8 b6 37. a6
-- ({Here Oltean exceeded the time in a hopeless position. White will soon get
two connected passed pawns on the queenside. A possible continuation is} 37...
Be6 38. e4 h6 39. Kh2 g5 40. Qb8 Rff7 41. Rxa7 Rxa7 42. Qxd8 Kh7 43. Qxb6 $18)
1-0
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10-06-2010, 06:25 AM
Post: #8
RE: C-Z Phoenix attack
Great! maybe I can post some of these in a later book.....probably much later...I'm so far behind! I was hoping to get either the follow-up to Zuke'Em or the C-K Phoenix book done by Christmas, but that does not appear to be in the cards.

I will, however, have a very nice set of science books out sometime soon....you can blame them for the delay.
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08-14-2015, 03:41 AM
Post: #9
RE: C-Z Phoenix attack
In the Swedish team championship (3rd league) I had a nice game with the Phoenix attack:

[Event "Div I Norra"]
[Site "Stockholm"]
[Date "2015.03.22"]
[Round "7.3"]
[White "Schroeder, Christoph"]
[Black "Jakenberg, Jussi"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D05"]
[WhiteElo "2199"]
[BlackElo "2036"]
[Annotator "Schroeder"]
[PlyCount "37"]
[EventDate "2015.??.??"]
[EventType "team"]
[EventRounds "7"]
[EventCountry "SWE"]
[WhiteTeam "Wasa SK"]
[BlackTeam "Sollentuna"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. e3 d5 4. Bd3 c5 5. O-O Nc6 6. b3 Bd6 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Bb2
O-O 9. a3 a6 10. b4 (10. Nbd2 b5 11. Qe2 Qe7 12. c4 bxc4 13. bxc4 Rb8 14. Rfb1
$1 Rd8 15. cxd5 exd5 16. Bxa6 Bf5 17. Bd3 Ne4 $44) 10... Bd6 11. Nbd2 b5 (11...
e5 12. c4 e4 13. Bxf6 gxf6 (13... Qxf6 14. Bxe4 $16) 14. cxd5 exf3 15. dxc6
fxg2 16. cxb7 (16. Qh5 Bxh2+ (16... gxf1=Q+ 17. Kxf1 f5 18. cxb7 Bxb7 19. Bxf5
Kg7 20. Qxh7+ Kf6 21. Be4 Ra7 22. Qf5+ Kg7 23. Bxb7 $16) 17. Kxg2 Qxd3 18. Kxh2
Qd6+ 19. Kh1 Qxc6+ 20. f3 Kh8 21. Rac1 Qe6 22. Ne4 $11) (16. Kxg2 Be5 17. Be4
Bxa1 18. Kh1 (18. cxb7 Bxb7 19. Bxb7 Rb8 $11) 18... Re8 19. cxb7 Bxb7 20. Bxb7
Ra7 21. Bc6 Re6 $11) (16. Re1 Bxh2+ 17. Kxh2 Qxd3 18. Rg1 Kh8 19. Rxg2 bxc6 20.
Qf3 Qf5 21. Rc1 Rd8 22. Qg3 Qg5 23. Qxg5 fxg5 24. Ne4 $11) 16... gxf1=Q+ 17.
Kxf1 Bh3+ 18. Ke1 Bxb4 19. Bxh7+ Kxh7 20. Qh5+ Kg8 21. axb4 Rb8 22. Qxh3 Qd5
$11 (22... Qd3)) 12. e4 dxe4 (12... d4 {
Carzolio,L-La Spina,M/Italy 1995/EXT 2002} 13. Nb3 e5 14. Rc1 $14) (12... Qc7
$5) 13. Nxe4 (13. Bxf6 gxf6 14. Nxe4 $14 {
Musiolik,D (1435)-Hommel,N (1501)/Magdeburg 2014}) 13... Be7 $6 (13... Nxe4 14.
Bxe4 Bb7 15. Qe2 $14) 14. Qe2 (14. Rc1 $16) 14... Bb7 15. Rfd1 Qc7 $2 (15...
Nd5 16. g3 $16 {followed by c4}) 16. Nxf6+ gxf6 $2 ({
My opponent had originally planned to play} 16... Bxf6 {
but now realized that after} 17. Qe4 {there is no way to defend the h7-pawn.
However, compared to what happens in the game, this would have been the lesser
evil. After the forced} Rfd8 18. Qxh7+ Kf8 19. Bxf6 gxf6 {
White probably has a winning advantage, but the game goes on.}) 17. Ng5 $1 {
A nice tactical blow exploiting the weakened black king's position. White has
an unstoppable mating attack.} h6 (17... fxg5 {allows a mate in three:} 18.
Bxh7+ Kxh7 19. Qh5+ Kg8 20. Qh8#) 18. Qh5 $1 Kg7 19. Nxe6+ ({In view of} 19.
Nxe6+ fxe6 20. Qg6+ Kh8 21. Qh7# {my opponent resigned.}) 1-0
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